TCJ – 02: More Of Illinois

The Chicagoland Journals:

I’ve been in the US for just over two weeks and when I think about it, I’ve packed a fair bit into that time – lots of new experiences. One such experience was my first visit to The Field Museum of Natural History! After walking through the city, alongside the huge mass of water that is Lake Michigan, I received my own lanyard and ID, along with a set of keys for the Arboretums office space. It’s official. I’m a research affiliate at one of the largest natural history museums in the world, with roughly 30 million specimens! As I walked the corridors behind the scenes of the public museum, the sheer number of resources available began to sink in. Admittedly, I got lost walking back to the office.

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“Sue,” the largest, best-preserved, and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever found.

During the rest of the weekday mornings, I was back out in the prairie doing the necessary work of weeding plots that had seen undesirable species encroach, as well as sowing some eco-grass along the walkways to held guard off against the more nasty weeds and to prevent soil erosion. Wednesday and Thursday afternoon held a training session on R and a lunchtime meeting. The R training lecture was largely things I already knew, however, there were a couple of techniques which I was unfamiliar with. Also, different ways to achieve the same results – just goes to show how people have their own solutions to situations. The lunch meeting was helpful in further orienting me with the work being completed at the Arboretum and who by. Listening to people talk about their research is a wonderful thing, and I’m very excited to help out with more projects, specifically the work relating to the hybridisation of the Quercus genus. Another fun thing we established that meeting was the book that we’re going to read, hopefully before Christmas. I’ve read the introduction already, and if the rest is anything like it then I think I can say that I will enjoy it.

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“Root beer,” a non-alcoholic soft drink.

I read the introduction on the train, Friday night, as I was going to Macomb to see my friend, Molly, who was studying abroad at Edge Hill last year. Fortune has it that she lives in the same state that I am currently working in, so it’s almost easy to meet up! The time it takes me to get the train over to see her, across half the state, is roughly the amount of time it takes me to travel from my hometown to my university – that’s roughly half the country. Since I arrived quite late, we had a meal, went shopping, and then hit the hay. But not before I tried both root beer, and spiced apple cider (both non-alcoholic, despite their names) for the first time. The cider was truly delicious, especially when warm.

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Myself (left) and Molly (right).

Another reason for visiting Molly when I did, was that is was her homecoming. Along with trying various soft drinks, going to the homecoming parade and football game were valuable entries on my American Bucket List. Although I’m not all too familiar with the rules of American football, it was fun to watch, especially for the halftime show – the band sounded wonderful and the baton twirling was a sight to behold as well. Molly had even altered a bear mascot head to represent Rocky, the bulldog mascot of Western Illinois University.

I finished off that busy week with walking three and a half miles to the shops, bumping into an exceedingly complimentary man whilst waiting for my Uber back to the arboretum. Once again, I have to wonder if the next week will be quite as packed with activities as these first two.

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TCJ – 01: Getting To Know The Prairie

The Chicagoland Journals:

So I’ve been in the US for a week now! That’s four days of work down at the prairie – weeding, digging and planting – as well as two-three days exploring the city. It’s been hard graft in the field, especially after the flight; jet lag is a real pain. But really just getting back into the fieldwork mentality and adjusting to the heat is the main issue.

During my first week here at the arboretum, I’ve been shown around the research building and introduced to many new people – colleagues, you could say, because i’m actually working here! (I’m still absorbing it all.) Everyone has been very friendly and welcoming, and I’m told that’s partially a midwest thing, but also that the arboretum staff really work together, so there’s almost a familial sense about it. I’m excited to start doing work with more members of the team.

Before I arrived, I knew I was to be doing work relating to the prairie (and how phylogenetic diversity affected the restoration of it) as well as work relating to the phylogeny of oaks. Now that I’ve got here, I know the immediate plans and some of the specifics of what I’m to be doing. I know that I’m going to be focusing on the prairie up until roughly January, and that when the current project leader goes on maternity leave, I’ll be filling her shoes to keep things running. Also on my agenda is to help figure out how to measure the biomass we’re to collect from the prairie to assess the level of restoration – and from that, if there’s a way to incorporate data from drones as part of a method.

Despite only being here for a week, I’ve managed to get into the city and attend VeganFest with a colleague, as well as get the train into (and the loop around) Chicago to see a film at the Reeling Film Festival (the film was Cat Skin, which was filmed in the UK so was a nice reminder of home). More locally, I walked down into Lisle, visited a 7-11, to get a slushie (something to check off my “American Bucket List”), and the local Aldi – again, a reminder of home.

It’s been a busy week and I am thoroughly exhausted. At this rate, I should be able to give a nice update on my activities in another week! Then again, perhaps this week has been so packed because it was the first.

Day 27: More of Umeå

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It’s been a quiet few weeks since I returned from Gällivare, which has left me with plenty of time to explore the city of Umeå and experience life here. A few days after my return, it was the weekend of Brännbollsyran – a music festival that has grown quite large in recent years that also sports a tournament of Brännboll (rounders) during the daytime. As well as the official event, there are many unofficial happenings that occur over the weekend, one of which was an outdoor DJ basically on our doorstep. After meeting some more wonderful people at pre-drinks, we arrived the party outside our apartment and I ran into some friends I met the week before! A coincidence that made the night even greater. There was a slightly harrowing part of the night, however, where we entered what we thought to be a regular party bus, but was actually full of Swedish nationalists. A Swedish-speaking friend clocked what was happening (as they understood what the bus-people were shouting), then led us swiftly back off the bus and explained the situation.

Back in the lab, Charlotte and I had been tasked with transferring the previous year’s insect collection from their containers filled with glycol to specimen jars with ethanol – tedious work, but important nonetheless. Another production-line-esque job was the transplanting of aspen seedlings from agar to soil. Charlotte and I switched roles of uprooting and replanting a few times so we each got the full experience and, working together with another researcher, we completed this task pretty swiftly. I found this much more enjoyable than the insect bottling, and really quite rewarding – I look forward to seeing the plants grow during the next few weeks.

 

 

 

Around a week ago was when I got my first pang of longing for home. It hit me that, after being in Sweden for around 2-3 weeks, I was really missing Ormskirk – a town I’ve grown to love – and my university friends that live there. After being surrounded by them since September 2016, this was probably the longest I’d gone without seeing them. I know that the two months of summer I have before (hopefully) heading out to the US will have to be spent seeing at least a few of them. This was also around the time of the snap general election and the unfortunate events at London Bridge.

A problem that we didn’t encounter in Gällivare which struck me the other day in the field was that of mosquitoes (and other flying insects). I can’t stand them. I was warned that there would be many, but I was not ready. The incessant buzzing of the flies as they whizz past your head, the omnipresent cloud of mosquitoes in your vision and the occasional bite together made it an unbearable experience. Next time I will be adequately equipped with a head net; hopefully, that will lessen the torture of the mosquito cloud, but will, unfortunately, do nothing to the sound of flies as they barrage obnoxiously close to my ears.

Snapchat-630975932Back to exploring the city: I went into the centre of town to witness the last part of the Swedish Gymnasium graduation – a parade with students on floats fitted with birch bundles, handmade banners, and music. It’s quite a sight coupled with their unique graduation caps and other traditions. That week I also experienced a BBQ by the lake, where BBQ means open fire in a concrete container whilst balancing food on sticks. Having such fire pits available to freely use allowed that event to take place a lot easier than a BBQ in the UK, and was really enjoyable. Another aspect of Sweden which I was informed about but not prepared for was the price of a drink in a bar, it rivals London on New Year’s Eve!

Day 13: A Taste of the Field

Well, my wishes of seeing reindeer have been granted! Whilst driving to and from Gällivare, where we were to set up some window traps to collect invertebrates, we spotted a few herds. It was quite a long drive, roughly a seven-hour trip including a lunch break. The day after our arrival, Charlotte and I took a hike up one of the small mountains nearby – we originally had our eyes set on the larger mountain, but Charlotte rightfully deemed it too great a task for a single morning.

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An assembled window trap in the field.

After lunch, we then set out into the field proper, marching through snow not for recreation – but for science. Needless to say, it was an exhausting day, made even more so by the fact that I checked out of my hostel at 3am the previous day due to being woken by an extremely loud snoring man! We covered a lot of ground and managed to get all the traps up that we needed to – a very productive day. Unfortunately, I was struck by a nasty cold the following day, so I stayed in the cabin and assembled the remaining traps. I’m glad I was able to be of use inside rather than out that day – I fear I would’ve only slowed the others down had I been in the field considering my state. In the end, it only took those two days to put up all the traps, with us waking early to travel back to Umea on the following day.

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Before heading up to Gällivare, however, Charlotte and I had coffee and pizza with two of the postgrads at SLU, beside Nydalasjön – a beautiful lake. It’s been nice getting to know people who live here, especially other students. I’ve learnt valuable things about the surrounding area, including but not limited to reputable tattoo parlours, revered local clubs, and really good pizza. Also, by this point I’ve become familiar with the wonder that is fika – and I love it.

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