TCJ – 04: Autumn Arrives

The Chicagoland Journals

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The biomass collection has begun! Mary-Claire, the research assistant in charge of the prairie restoration project, had her last week before going on maternity leave. so I assisted her in the prairie on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. Due to pretty heavy rain on Wednesday, I made use of my time by arranging our backlog of biomass that was in the cooler and then weighing the biomass that had been dried in the ovens since Monday. Whilst I sorted the chilled plants, four of our volunteers finished weighing the paper bags we use to collect the biomass – I had spent two afternoons doing this, yet the volunteers managed to get all the remaining bags measured in just one morning!

After the initial collecting on Monday, we realised a few issues. Primarily, that we needed even smaller bags for some of the species, as there was hardly any above ground biomass remaining. This was resolved by Wednesday, when Mary-Claire acquired some new and tinier bags. Another issue encountered was that the leaf litter in the plots with fifteen different species was difficult to ID to species and would’ve taken more time than we had available. We settled on collecting all this detritus into a separate bag to be included in the total biomass of the plot.

IMG_20171014_095905.jpgOn Friday, I took another trip to Macomb to see my “friend from Edge Hill, who is actually from Illinois,” Molly. She had many things to show me, her home in “The Boonies,” The Spoon River Valley Scenic Drive, and Wildlife Prairie Park.

A friend of mine in secondary school used to joke about me living in the middle of nowhere because I lived just outside a small village. We only lived 20 miles apart. Being driven through Illinois, just one state in the US, really gave me a sense of perspective. Although most food along the drive wasn’t vegan, I did manage to eat an obscene amount of popcorn and a delicious apple cider slushie. I also had a “lemon shake-up” a still, sugary lemon drink. Still on my American Bucket List is trying American lemonade, which is different from the lemonade back across the bond that is synonymous with Sprite or 7-Up. After driving back to Molly’s home, we cooked up some funnel cake made with soy milk, which was enough to induce a food coma combined with everything else from that morning.

IMG_20171014_182731.jpgThat night, after driving back up to Western Illinois University, strong enough winds occurred to warrant a tornado warning. We were just on the eastern edge of the stormy area, with more severe weather expected to our west. Still, just seeing the rain fall nearly horizontal outside the window was incredible – although I was happy to be inside.

The weather cleared up for the following day, although it was still fairly windy at times. Molly and I headed down to Wildlife Prairie Park, a zoological park home to many native animals of the Illinois area – most of which seemed to be rescued after a serious injury or taken in after being kept as illegal pets. What was also nice to see was a historical section in the visitor centre, detailing the history of the area, and how Peoria got its name (it’s named after the Peoria tribe). Before returning to Macomb station, we visited what must’ve been the biggest bookstore I’ve ever seen in my life. A Barnes and Nobles that according to Yelp reviewer Colleen is only “average-sized.” I guess most things really are just bigger in America.

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TCJ – 03: Fieldwork Firsts

The Chicagoland Journals

Time for the Prairie Rundown: Last week started with my first (and then second) day in the field alone – I cycled down to the prairie in the morning, set up the sprinklers, and weeded. I repeated this on Tuesday, except the watering was taken care of by the weather, leaving me with a rather wet bike and not a whole lot of time to weed (lesson learnt about trusting the weather forecast). Wednesday was another rainy day, but not enough to keep me and the others from weeding, it was merely spitting until around 10am. Thursday saw me take charge in the field, leading two volunteers – this wasn’t as hard as I’d expected, I suppose that over the course of these two-three weeks I’ve come to understand the project and the imminent plans for it. On Friday, I began weighing the paper bags that we’ll be using to collect the biomass in – soon, we’re going to collect a portion of each plot, separated by species for the mixed plots, and dry the plant matter in an oven, this dry biomass will then be weighed to determine its productivity this growing season.

In “un-prairelated” news (apologies for the pun), last Monday’s Tree Talk was presented by Christina Carrero on the importance of building a community around arboreta, and how the Morton Arboretum’s ArbNet helps do just that. It was a very enjoyable lecture highlighting how important communication is to maximise our conservation efforts.

A surprising event unfurled on Tuesday – due to a mix-up when I arrived, I was in the wrong housing for the first two weeks! Meaning that when my third week rolled around, I had to be moved from one house to another. I am now in the house I was originally meant to be in, and although smaller, I think I prefer it (the WiFi signal is stronger here).

TCJ - 03Also, this week was another lab meeting, this time focussed around the book that we have been reading: Improbable Destinies by Jonathan B. Losos. The intro and chapter one really sold the book to me, some very interesting points were made about convergent evolution and the nature of adaptation.

Friday also saw me start work in the lab… sort of! I was taken on a safety tour, then helped rearrange some vials from the freezer. Still, it was good to see the lab properly and spend some time there helping out. Next week we’re looking to start biomass collection if the weather permits and pretty soon I’ll be taking over in the field as the project head goes on maternity leave. Exciting times ahead!

TCJ – 02: More Of Illinois

The Chicagoland Journals:

I’ve been in the US for just over two weeks and when I think about it, I’ve packed a fair bit into that time – lots of new experiences. One such experience was my first visit to The Field Museum of Natural History! After walking through the city, alongside the huge mass of water that is Lake Michigan, I received my own lanyard and ID, along with a set of keys for the Arboretums office space. It’s official. I’m a research affiliate at one of the largest natural history museums in the world, with roughly 30 million specimens! As I walked the corridors behind the scenes of the public museum, the sheer number of resources available began to sink in. Admittedly, I got lost walking back to the office.

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“Sue,” the largest, best-preserved, and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex ever found.

During the rest of the weekday mornings, I was back out in the prairie doing the necessary work of weeding plots that had seen undesirable species encroach, as well as sowing some eco-grass along the walkways to held guard off against the more nasty weeds and to prevent soil erosion. Wednesday and Thursday afternoon held a training session on R and a lunchtime meeting. The R training lecture was largely things I already knew, however, there were a couple of techniques which I was unfamiliar with. Also, different ways to achieve the same results – just goes to show how people have their own solutions to situations. The lunch meeting was helpful in further orienting me with the work being completed at the Arboretum and who by. Listening to people talk about their research is a wonderful thing, and I’m very excited to help out with more projects, specifically the work relating to the hybridisation of the Quercus genus. Another fun thing we established that meeting was the book that we’re going to read, hopefully before Christmas. I’ve read the introduction already, and if the rest is anything like it then I think I can say that I will enjoy it.

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“Root beer,” a non-alcoholic soft drink.

I read the introduction on the train, Friday night, as I was going to Macomb to see my friend, Molly, who was studying abroad at Edge Hill last year. Fortune has it that she lives in the same state that I am currently working in, so it’s almost easy to meet up! The time it takes me to get the train over to see her, across half the state, is roughly the amount of time it takes me to travel from my hometown to my university – that’s roughly half the country. Since I arrived quite late, we had a meal, went shopping, and then hit the hay. But not before I tried both root beer, and spiced apple cider (both non-alcoholic, despite their names) for the first time. The cider was truly delicious, especially when warm.

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Myself (left) and Molly (right).

Another reason for visiting Molly when I did, was that is was her homecoming. Along with trying various soft drinks, going to the homecoming parade and football game were valuable entries on my American Bucket List. Although I’m not all too familiar with the rules of American football, it was fun to watch, especially for the halftime show – the band sounded wonderful and the baton twirling was a sight to behold as well. Molly had even altered a bear mascot head to represent Rocky, the bulldog mascot of Western Illinois University.

I finished off that busy week with walking three and a half miles to the shops, bumping into an exceedingly complimentary man whilst waiting for my Uber back to the arboretum. Once again, I have to wonder if the next week will be quite as packed with activities as these first two.

TCJ – 01: Getting To Know The Prairie

The Chicagoland Journals:

So I’ve been in the US for a week now! That’s four days of work down at the prairie – weeding, digging and planting – as well as two-three days exploring the city. It’s been hard graft in the field, especially after the flight; jet lag is a real pain. But really just getting back into the fieldwork mentality and adjusting to the heat is the main issue.

During my first week here at the arboretum, I’ve been shown around the research building and introduced to many new people – colleagues, you could say, because i’m actually working here! (I’m still absorbing it all.) Everyone has been very friendly and welcoming, and I’m told that’s partially a midwest thing, but also that the arboretum staff really work together, so there’s almost a familial sense about it. I’m excited to start doing work with more members of the team.

Before I arrived, I knew I was to be doing work relating to the prairie (and how phylogenetic diversity affected the restoration of it) as well as work relating to the phylogeny of oaks. Now that I’ve got here, I know the immediate plans and some of the specifics of what I’m to be doing. I know that I’m going to be focusing on the prairie up until roughly January, and that when the current project leader goes on maternity leave, I’ll be filling her shoes to keep things running. Also on my agenda is to help figure out how to measure the biomass we’re to collect from the prairie to assess the level of restoration – and from that, if there’s a way to incorporate data from drones as part of a method.

Despite only being here for a week, I’ve managed to get into the city and attend VeganFest with a colleague, as well as get the train into (and the loop around) Chicago to see a film at the Reeling Film Festival (the film was Cat Skin, which was filmed in the UK so was a nice reminder of home). More locally, I walked down into Lisle, visited a 7-11, to get a slushie (something to check off my “American Bucket List”), and the local Aldi – again, a reminder of home.

It’s been a busy week and I am thoroughly exhausted. At this rate, I should be able to give a nice update on my activities in another week! Then again, perhaps this week has been so packed because it was the first.

Day 34: Traditions and Updates

This week saw the beginning of one line of work, and the continuation of another. We began work with some small logs that are part of a global study looking at decomposition rates – on Tuesday morning we collected the logs for this year’s measurements, and Wednesday afternoon we made the initial measurements before leaving them in the drier for the next few days. It’s quite incredible to think that we helped in a study that is being performed globally. Tuesday afternoon’s excursion was to collect some beetles (which, if I recall correctly, were Phratora vitellinae) from young aspen trees that will be later used in an experiment on the GM aspen seedlings back in the greenhouse. We also gained a valuable insight into the “fish people’s” work on Tuesday morning, and how their catch, tag, and release projects operate.

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Yesterday also happened to be Midsummer’s Eve, as the Swedish celebrations of this holiday always occur on the Friday between June 19th and June 25th. The weather was lovely and sunny, matching the warm atmosphere that surrounded the festivities. The day started with wreath making, which we missed out on until Charlotte decided to give it a shot later in the day. What we were in time to see was the dancing around and raising of the maypole. Whilst at Västerbottens Museum, we also ate some traditional sour bread and had a look at some of the Sami structures. 

Midsummer’s Eve also coincided with the update of Pokémon GO’s GYMs, meaning I was once again on my bike, catching and battling with the pocket monsters much like I was last summer after the launch of the game.

Day 27: More of Umeå

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It’s been a quiet few weeks since I returned from Gällivare, which has left me with plenty of time to explore the city of Umeå and experience life here. A few days after my return, it was the weekend of Brännbollsyran – a music festival that has grown quite large in recent years that also sports a tournament of Brännboll (rounders) during the daytime. As well as the official event, there are many unofficial happenings that occur over the weekend, one of which was an outdoor DJ basically on our doorstep. After meeting some more wonderful people at pre-drinks, we arrived the party outside our apartment and I ran into some friends I met the week before! A coincidence that made the night even greater. There was a slightly harrowing part of the night, however, where we entered what we thought to be a regular party bus, but was actually full of Swedish nationalists. A Swedish-speaking friend clocked what was happening (as they understood what the bus-people were shouting), then led us swiftly back off the bus and explained the situation.

Back in the lab, Charlotte and I had been tasked with transferring the previous year’s insect collection from their containers filled with glycol to specimen jars with ethanol – tedious work, but important nonetheless. Another production-line-esque job was the transplanting of aspen seedlings from agar to soil. Charlotte and I switched roles of uprooting and replanting a few times so we each got the full experience and, working together with another researcher, we completed this task pretty swiftly. I found this much more enjoyable than the insect bottling, and really quite rewarding – I look forward to seeing the plants grow during the next few weeks.

 

 

 

Around a week ago was when I got my first pang of longing for home. It hit me that, after being in Sweden for around 2-3 weeks, I was really missing Ormskirk – a town I’ve grown to love – and my university friends that live there. After being surrounded by them since September 2016, this was probably the longest I’d gone without seeing them. I know that the two months of summer I have before (hopefully) heading out to the US will have to be spent seeing at least a few of them. This was also around the time of the snap general election and the unfortunate events at London Bridge.

A problem that we didn’t encounter in Gällivare which struck me the other day in the field was that of mosquitoes (and other flying insects). I can’t stand them. I was warned that there would be many, but I was not ready. The incessant buzzing of the flies as they whizz past your head, the omnipresent cloud of mosquitoes in your vision and the occasional bite together made it an unbearable experience. Next time I will be adequately equipped with a head net; hopefully, that will lessen the torture of the mosquito cloud, but will, unfortunately, do nothing to the sound of flies as they barrage obnoxiously close to my ears.

Snapchat-630975932Back to exploring the city: I went into the centre of town to witness the last part of the Swedish Gymnasium graduation – a parade with students on floats fitted with birch bundles, handmade banners, and music. It’s quite a sight coupled with their unique graduation caps and other traditions. That week I also experienced a BBQ by the lake, where BBQ means open fire in a concrete container whilst balancing food on sticks. Having such fire pits available to freely use allowed that event to take place a lot easier than a BBQ in the UK, and was really enjoyable. Another aspect of Sweden which I was informed about but not prepared for was the price of a drink in a bar, it rivals London on New Year’s Eve!

Day 13: A Taste of the Field

Well, my wishes of seeing reindeer have been granted! Whilst driving to and from Gällivare, where we were to set up some window traps to collect invertebrates, we spotted a few herds. It was quite a long drive, roughly a seven-hour trip including a lunch break. The day after our arrival, Charlotte and I took a hike up one of the small mountains nearby – we originally had our eyes set on the larger mountain, but Charlotte rightfully deemed it too great a task for a single morning.

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An assembled window trap in the field.

After lunch, we then set out into the field proper, marching through snow not for recreation – but for science. Needless to say, it was an exhausting day, made even more so by the fact that I checked out of my hostel at 3am the previous day due to being woken by an extremely loud snoring man! We covered a lot of ground and managed to get all the traps up that we needed to – a very productive day. Unfortunately, I was struck by a nasty cold the following day, so I stayed in the cabin and assembled the remaining traps. I’m glad I was able to be of use inside rather than out that day – I fear I would’ve only slowed the others down had I been in the field considering my state. In the end, it only took those two days to put up all the traps, with us waking early to travel back to Umea on the following day.

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Before heading up to Gällivare, however, Charlotte and I had coffee and pizza with two of the postgrads at SLU, beside Nydalasjön – a beautiful lake. It’s been nice getting to know people who live here, especially other students. I’ve learnt valuable things about the surrounding area, including but not limited to reputable tattoo parlours, revered local clubs, and really good pizza. Also, by this point I’ve become familiar with the wonder that is fika – and I love it.

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